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Canadian Legislations

September 21, 2010

1. Targeted Individuals normally experience several stages of harassment. The criminal Harassments – Section 264 of the Criminal Code of Canada focuses on the initial stages.  The law tackles the safety of the victims as well as the prohibited stalking conducts.  Although the section didn’t mentioned about voice to skull harassments, the section mentioned about “relentless communications” by the harassers either directly or indirectly. Indirect that can be use in the microwave/voice to skull harassments that TI normally experienced in the later stages of their harassments.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 264 – Criminal Harassment
No person shall, without lawful authority and knowing that another person is harassed or recklessly as to whether the other person is harassed, engage in conduct referred to in subsection (2) that causes that other person reasonably, in all the circumstances, to fear for their safety or the safety of anyone known to them.

Prohibited conduct – The conduct mentioned in subsection (1) consists of (a) repeatedly following from place to place the other person or anyone known to them; (b) repeatedly communicating with, either directly or indirectly, the other person or anyone known to them; (c) besetting or watching the dwelling-house, or place where the other person, or anyone known to them, resides, works, carries on business or happens to be; or (d) engaging in threatening conduct directed at the other person or any member of their family. Punishment (3) Every person who contravenes this section is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

2. Targeted Individuals normally experience harassment with “uttering threats” from their harassers.  These can be directly or indirectly.  The later stage of the harassments involves voice to skull (electronic harassment either microwave low/high frequencies) technology. These electronic transmission of harassments involves uttering threats and simulated physical assaults. These indirect harassment are being inflicted intentionally by perpetrators, 24/7 and can be considered physical and mental torture.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 264 – Criminal Harassment
Uttering threats 1 (1) Every one commits an offence who, in any manner, knowingly utters, conveys or causes any person to receive a threat (a) to cause death or bodily harm to any person; (b) to burn, destroy or damage real or personal property; or (c) to kill, poison or injure an animal or bird that is the property of any person. Punishment (2) Every one who commits an offence under paragraph (1)(a) is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding eighteen months.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 269 – Torture
(1) Every official, or every person acting at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of an official, who inflicts torture on any other person is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years. Torture means any act or omission by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person (a) for a purpose including (i) obtaining from the person or from a third person information or a statement, (ii) punishing the person for an act that the person or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, and (iii) intimidating or coercing the person or a third person, or (b) for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, but does not include any act or omission arising only from, inherent in or incidental to lawful sanctions.

3. Targeted Individuals normally experience harassment with people related to them.  Their full knowledge (of the harassment) are discussed in section 219 and 220 of the Criminal code.  These sections explained the act of disregard for lives and safety of other person as well as putting a blind eye while witnessing harassment and/or a crime.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 219, 220 – Criminal Negligence
When an individual has the mens rea (knowledge) that a crime has been, is or will be committed. This includes being willfully blind or careless. (mens rea – Intent in criminal law. As a general rule, you can’t be guilty of a criminal offence if you inadvertently did something against the law. Crimes require a deliberate act or recklessness. There are lots of exceptions to this general rule.) 219. (1) Every one is criminally negligent who (a) in doing anything, or (b) in omitting to do anything that it is his duty to do, shows wanton or reckless disregard for the lives or safety of other persons. Definition of “duty” (2) For the purposes of this section, “duty” means a duty imposed by law. 220. Every person who by criminal negligence causes death to another person is guilty of an indictable offence and liable (a) where a firearm is used in the commission of the offence, to imprisonment for life and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of four years; and (b) in any other case, to imprisonment for life.

4. Targeted Individuals normally experience physical assaults through direct energy weapons and indirectly through voice to skull transmission normally when induced into dreams via physical assault simulations. TI normally experienced the feeling of someone hitting them in the head and vibrations in different body parts.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 265, 266 – Assaults
265: A person commits an assault when: (a) without the consent of another person, he applies force intentionally to that other person, directly or indirectly; (b) he attempts or threatens, by an act or a gesture, to apply force to another person, if he has, or causes that other person to believe on reasonable grounds that he has, present ability to effect his purpose. 266: Every one who commits an assault is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

5. Targeted Individuals normally experience physical assaults from perpetrators using technological weapons considered by many as non-lethal because of its non-violent outcomes and the perceptions of the victims’ condition/death as from natural causes.  Targeted Individuals will normally suffered bodily harm that can be considered as aggravated assaults.  Results are wounds, maims, disfigurements, severe pains and psychological conditions from indirect tortures (voice to skull) and indirect/silent weapons (direct energy weapons).

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 267 – Weapons
(a) Carries, uses or threatens to use a weapon or an imitation thereof, or (b) causes bodily harm to the complainant, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years or an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding eighteen months.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 268 – Aggravated Assault
(1) Every one commits an aggravated assault who wounds, maims, disfigures or endangers the life of the complainant. (2) Every one who commits an aggravated assault is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 269 – Bodily Harm
Every one who unlawfully causes bodily harm to any person is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding eighteen months.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 244 – With Intent
(1) Every person commits an offence who discharges a firearm at a person with intent to wound, maim or disfigure, to endanger the life of or to prevent the arrest or detention of any person — whether or not that person is the one at whom the firearm is discharged.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 244 – Air Gun or Pistol
1. Every person who, with intent (a) to wound, maim or disfigure any person, (b) to endanger the life of any person, or (c) to prevent the arrest or detention of any person, discharges an air or compressed gas gun or pistol at any person, whether or not that person is the person mentioned in paragraph (a), (b) or (c), is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

6. Targeted Individuals experience food poisoning and other noxious inhalants normally sprayed on their place of work or at their residences.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 245 – Administering Noxious Thing
Every one who administers or causes to be administered to any person or causes any person to take poison or any other destructive or noxious thing is guilty of an indictable offence and liable (a) to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years, if he intends thereby to endanger the life of or to cause bodily harm to that person; or (b) to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, if he intends thereby to aggrieve or annoy that person.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 246 – With Intent
Every one who, with intent to enable or assist himself or another person to commit an indictable offence, (a) attempts, by any means, to choke, suffocate or strangle another person, or by any means calculated to choke, suffocate or strangle, attempts to render another person insensible, unconscious or incapable of resistance, or (b) administers or causes to be administered to any person, or attempts to administer to any person, or causes or attempts to cause any person to take a stupefying or overpowering drug, matter or thing, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for life.

7. Targeted Individuals normally experience injuries brought by events that may look like accidents but in fact were staged, trapped and planned by perpetrators.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 247
Traps likely to cause bodily harm (1) Every one is guilty of an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years, who with intent to cause death or bodily harm to a person, whether ascertained or not, (a) sets or places a trap, device or other thing that is likely to cause death or bodily harm to a person; or (b) being in occupation or possession of a place, knowingly permits such a trap, device or other thing to remain in that place. Bodily harm: (2) Every one who commits an offence under subsection (1) and thereby causes bodily harm to any other person is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years….Death (5) Every one who commits an offence under subsection (1) and thereby causes the death of any other person is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for life.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 248 – With Intent
Every one who, with intent to endanger the safety of any person, places anything on or does anything to any property that is used for or in connection with the transportation of persons or goods by land, water or air that is likely to cause death or bodily harm to persons is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for life.

8. Targeted Individuals normally experience times of being misdiagnosed with mental illness and mostly be under the supervision of assigned guardian, perpetrators will normally take advantage of these situation and make the guardian under duress or influence to commit crimes, but these does not excuse them under the law, to perform that duty of preservation of life or safety of victims.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 215
Duties Tending to Preservation of Life – Duty of persons to provide necessaries 215 (1) Every one is under a legal duty (a) as a parent, foster parent, guardian or head of a family, to provide necessaries of life for a child under the age of sixteen years; (b) to provide necessaries of life to their spouse or common-law partner; and (c) to provide necessaries of life to a person under his charge if that person (i) is unable, by reason of detention, age, illness, mental disorder or other cause, to withdraw himself from that charge, and (ii) is unable to provide himself with necessaries of life.

Offence (2) Every one commits an offence who, being under a legal duty within the meaning of subsection (1), fails without lawful excuse, the proof of which lies on him, to perform that duty, if (a) with respect to a duty imposed by paragraph (1)(a) or (b), (i) the person to whom the duty is owed is in destitute or necessitous circumstances, or (ii) the failure to perform the duty endangers the life of the person to whom the duty is owed, or causes or is likely to cause the health of that person to be endangered permanently; or (b) with respect to a duty imposed by paragraph (1)(c), the failure to perform the duty endangers the life of the person to whom the duty is owed or causes or is likely to cause the health of that person to be injured permanently. Punishment: (3) Every one who commits an offence under subsection (2) (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years; or (b) is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding eighteen months.

9. Targeted Individuals’ employers who has knowledge of the harassment and the electronic devices used to harm them has the duty to protect or prevent bodily harm to that person according to section 217 of the Criminal Code of Canada.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 217
Every one who undertakes, or has the authority, to direct how another person does work or performs a task is under a legal duty to take reasonable steps to prevent bodily harm to that person, or any other person, arising from that work or task.

10. Targeted Individuals’ fate ends with homicide. As most of Targeted Individuals are perpetrated by a group of individuals, the Criminal Code of Canada mentioned about “criminal organization” where the act of homicide/murder are under the direction of a specific group.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 222
(1) A person commits homicide when, directly or indirectly, by any means, he causes the death of a human being. Murder — criminal organization. (6.1) Irrespective of whether a murder is planned and deliberate on the part of a person, murder is first degree murder when (a) the death is caused by that person for the benefit of, at the direction of or in association with a criminal organization; or (b) the death is caused by that person while committing or attempting to commit an indictable offence under this or any other Act of Parliament for the benefit of, at the direction of or in association with a criminal organization.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 240
Accessory after fact to murder – Every one who is an accessory after the fact to murder is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for life.

11. Targeted Individuals’ normally committed suicide as a result of voice to skull and other psychological harassment.  These acts of aiding/coaching a suicide normally through voice to skull technologies are related to section 241 of the Criminal Code of Canada.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 241
Suicide Counseling or aiding suicide – Every one who (a) counsels a person to commit suicide, or (b) aids or abets a person to commit suicide, whether suicide ensues or not, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

12. Targeted Individuals normally experience sexual assaults either directly or indirectly.  Directly by influencing/coaching them to do sexual activities while under the influence of substance and/or they are preconditioned psychologically by their handlers. Indirectly, by voice to skull or microwave low frequencies hearing with relentless harassment about their sexual activities, habits, past and ridiculing/embarrassing them. Using direct energy weapon, targeted individuals usually experience body attacks in their genitalia.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 271 – Sexual assault
(1) Every one who commits a sexual assault is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding eighteen months.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 272 Sexual assault
Sexual assault with a weapon, threats to a third party or causing bodily harm – . (1) Every person commits an offence who, in committing a sexual assault, (a) carries, uses or threatens to use a weapon or an imitation of a weapon; (b) threatens to cause bodily harm to a person other than the complainant; (c) causes bodily harm to the complainant; or (d) is a party to the offence with any other person.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 273 – Aggravated sexual assault
(1) Every one commits an aggravated sexual assault who, in committing a sexual assault, wounds, maims, disfigures or endangers the life of the complainant.

13. Targeted Individuals normally experience a noticeable change in behavior of the people that surrounds them because perpetrators will performed “character assassination campaign,” defaming them or “planting a seed” directly or indirectly to these people so to question targeted individual’s reputation or character.  Other people may profit from targeted individuals’ handlers in exchange for their cooperation.  It can be from small tasks of walking in front of the house, beeping cars or slamming car doors loudly when Tis are around or during the intitial stage of gathering information.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 298, 300, 301 – Defamatory Libel
298. (1) A defamatory libel is matter published, without lawful justification or excuse, that is likely to injure the reputation of any person by exposing him to hatred, contempt or ridicule, or that is designed to insult the person of or concerning whom it is published. Mode of expression (2) A defamatory libel may be expressed directly or by insinuation or irony (a) in words legibly marked on any substance; or (b) by any object signifying a defamatory libel otherwise than by words. 300. Every one who publishes a defamatory libel that he knows is false is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years. 301 – Punishment for defamatory libel – Every one who publishes a defamatory libel is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 302 – Extortion by libel
Every one commits an offence who, with intent (a) to extort money from any person, or (b) to induce a person to confer on or procure for another person an appointment or office of profit or trust, publishes or threatens to publish or offers to abstain from publishing or to prevent the publication of a defamatory libel. Punishment – Every one who commits an offence under this section is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.

14. Targeted Individuals will questioned the reason behind all the harassments and their downfall.   A well-informed TI will eventually come to a conclusion that there is no logical explanation of their predicaments as the perpetrators will never accept any logical reasoning and will continue their evil activities no matter what.  The harassments, directly or indirectly, normally involves ridiculing, insulting and belittling targeted individuals and all things about him/her such as, religion, ethnic background, sexual orientations. The harassment protocols will involve matching one identifiable group to another, one religion to another religion or one political group to another, all to get or induced reactions from targeted individuals.  And as the harassment is broadcast via satellite, it considered “public incitement of hatred.”

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 318, 319 – Hate Propaganda
Definition of “identifiable group” (4) In this section, “identifiable group” means any section of the public distinguished by colour, race, religion, ethnic origin or sexual orientation. Public incitement of hatred – 319. (1) Every one who, by communicating statements in any public place, incites hatred against any identifiable group where such incitement is likely to lead to a breach of the peace is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Wilful promotion of hatred – (2) Every one who, by communicating statements, other than in private conversation, wilfully promotes hatred against any identifiable group is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act
“crime against humanity” means murder, extermination, enslavement, deportation, imprisonment, torture, sexual violence, persecution or any other inhumane act or omission that is committed against any civilian population or any identifiable group and that, at the time and in the place of its commission, constitutes a crime against humanity according to customary international law or conventional international law or by virtue of its being criminal according to the general principles of law recognized by the community of nations, whether or not it constitutes a contravention of the law in force at the time and in the place of its commission. “genocide” means an act or omission committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, an identifiable group of persons, as such, that, at the time and in the place of its commission, constitutes genocide according to customary international law or conventional international law or by virtue of its being criminal according to the general principles of law recognized by the community of nations, whether or not it constitutes a contravention of the law in force at the time and in the place of its commission.

15. Targeted Individuals will experience destruction of private properties throughout their harassment.  They will notice and discover that all their socks will get holes in it.  The zipper of their jackets are destroyed and even things that are not valuable to some but is considered important to targeted individual missing.  These things will then appear after a short period of disappearance.  Targeted Individuals who are writers/artists will experience destruction of their works.  The later part of their harassment involved induced dreams broadcast via satellite, inducing them with information and robbing them with their natural dreams maybe considered theft.  Dreams maybe considered by some as intellectual properties although there is no legislations or any information available about this topic.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 348
Breaking and entering with intent, committing offence or breaking out – 348. (1) Every one who (a) breaks and enters a place with intent to commit an indictable offence therein, (b) breaks and enters a place and commits an indictable offence therein, or (c) breaks out of a place after (i) committing an indictable offence therein, or (ii) entering the place with intent to commit an indictable offence therein, is guilty (d) if the offence is committed in relation to a dwelling-house, of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for life, and (e) if the offence is committed in relation to a place other than a dwelling-house, of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years or of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 321, 322 – Property Rights
Theft – 322. (1) Every one commits theft who fraudulently and without colour of right takes, or fraudulently and without colour of right converts to his use or to the use of another person, anything, whether animate or inanimate, with intent (a) to deprive, temporarily or absolutely, the owner of it, or a person who has a special property or interest in it, of the thing or of his property or interest in it; (b) to pledge it or deposit it as security; (c) to part with it under a condition with respect to its return that the person who parts with it may be unable to perform; or (d) to deal with it in such a manner that it cannot be restored in the condition in which it was at the time it was taken or converted. Time when theft completed (2) A person commits theft when, with intent to steal anything, he moves it or causes it to move or to be moved, or begins to cause it to become movable. Secrecy (3) A taking or conversion of anything may be fraudulent notwithstanding that it is effected without secrecy or attempt at concealment. Purpose of taking (4) For the purposes of this Act, the question whether anything that is converted is taken for the purpose of conversion, or whether it is, at the time it is converted, in the lawful possession of the person who converts it is not material.

16. Targeted Individuals will experience destruction of private properties throughout their harassment.  They will notice and discover that all their computer files has been changed, modified or missing. They will also experience several computer crashes.  They will receive junk mails from several e-marketers.  Their Internet use including web-site visited and e-mail received/sent are monitored.  All these internet information are use for the perpetrator’s harassment protocols. Targeted Individuals will also experienced electo-magnetic radiations emmitting from their computer, mostly on the later stage of the harassments as well as accoustic harassments such as hearing unrelated voices added to music or any media they are watching/using.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 342, 430
Unauthorized use of computer – 342.1 (1) Every one who, fraudulently and without colour of right, (a) obtains, directly or indirectly, any computer service, (b) by means of an electro-magnetic, acoustic, mechanical or other device, intercepts or causes to be intercepted, directly or indirectly, any function of a computer system, (c) uses or causes to be used, directly or indirectly, a computer system with intent to commit an offence under paragraph (a) or (b) or an offence under section 430 in relation to data or a computer system, or (d) uses, possesses, traffics in or permits another person to have access to a computer password that would enable a person to commit an offence under paragraph (a), (b) or (c) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years, or is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Definitions (2) In this section, “electro-magnetic, acoustic, mechanical or other device” means any device or apparatus that is used or is capable of being used to intercept any function of a computer system, but does not include a hearing aid used to correct subnormal hearing of the user to not better than normal hearing; “intercept” includes listen to or record a function of a computer system, or acquire the substance, meaning or purport thereof.

17. Targeted Individuals will experience changes in the delivery of their mails as well as mails that are noticeably opened with out their consent. They will also received a series of junk mails that are noticeably patterned to their characters or likes all to induce the feeling of someone has been snooping/spying and resulting with induced paranoia.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 345
Stopping mail with intent – 345 Every one who stops a mail conveyance with intent to rob or search it is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for life.

18. Targeted Individuals will experience harassment where perpetrators will impersonate the identity of targeted individuals.  Normally on the later stage of harassments, the impersonations are to give the impressions that the targeted individuals are being affected by the harassments.  This is important because all these harassments are normally broadcast via satellite or internet.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 361 False Pretences
Definition of “identity information” 402.1 For the purposes of sections 402.2 and 403, “identity information” means any information — including biological or physiological information — of a type that is commonly used alone or in combination with other information to identify or purport to identify an individual, including a fingerprint, voice print, retina image, iris image, DNA profile, name, address, date of birth, written signature, electronic signature, digital signature, user name, credit card number, debit card number, financial institution account number, passport number, Social Insurance Number, health insurance number, driver’s licence number or password.

402.2 (1) Everyone commits an offence who knowingly obtains or possesses another person’s identity information in circumstances giving rise to a reasonable inference that the information is intended to be used to commit an indictable offence that includes fraud, deceit or falsehood as an element of the offence. (2) Everyone commits an offence who transmits, makes available, distributes, sells or offers for sale another person’s identity information, or has it in their possession for any of those purposes, knowing that or being reckless as to whether the information will be used to commit an indictable offence that includes fraud, deceit or falsehood as an element of the offence.

19. Targeted Individuals will experience harassment where perpetrators will set off “fire alarm” in the building where TI lives or work that are always a false alarm.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 437 – False Alarm of Fire
Other Interference with Property – False alarm of fire – 437. Every one who wilfully, without reasonable cause, by outcry, ringing bells, using a fire alarm, telephone or telegraph, or in any other manner, makes or circulates or causes to be made or circulated an alarm of fire is guilty of (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

20. Targeted Individuals will experience harassment where perpetrators will give or made illegal or illicit drugs available to them that clearly established the group has access to illegal substance.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 462 – Instruments and literature for illicit drug use
“illicit drug use” means the importation, exportation, production, sale or possession of a controlled substance or precursor contrary to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act or a regulation made under that Act; 462.2 Every one who knowingly imports into Canada, exports from Canada, manufactures, promotes or sells instruments or literature for illicit drug use is guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction (a) for a first offence, to a fine not exceeding one hundred thousand dollars or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to both; or (b) for a second or subsequent offence, to a fine not exceeding three hundred thousand dollars or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or to both.

21. Targeted Individuals will experience harassment where perpetrators will illegally videotaped/audio recorded (wire tapping) individuals in their intimate hours that are sexual in nature or any activities relating to hygiene, and publicly broadcast them via internet or satellite, all to humiliate, embarrass, belittling them.

Criminal Code of Canada – Section 162 Voyeurism
162. (1) Every one commits an offence who, surreptitiously, observes — including by mechanical or electronic means — or makes a visual recording of a person who is in circumstances that give rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy, if (a) the person is in a place in which a person can reasonably be expected to be nude, to expose his or her genital organs or anal region or her breasts, or to be engaged in explicit sexual activity; (b) the person is nude, is exposing his or her genital organs or anal region or her breasts, or is engaged in explicit sexual activity, and the observation or recording is done for the purpose of observing or recording a person in such a state or engaged in such an activity; or (c) the observation or recording is done for a sexual purpose.

Definition of “visual recording” (2) In this section, “visual recording” includes a photographic, film or video recording made by any means. (4) Every one commits an offence who, knowing that a recording was obtained by the commission of an offence under subsection (1), prints, copies, publishes, distributes, circulates, sells, advertises or makes available the recording, or has the recording in his or her possession for the purpose of printing, copying, publishing, distributing, circulating, selling or advertising it or making it available.

22. Targeted Individuals will experience harassments that are broadcast via satellite or via internet violating their privacy. Information about them are being publicly reveal including information about their the race, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, age, marital status, education, medical, criminal, financial or employment history without their consent.

Privacy Act
Collection of personal information 4. No personal information shall be collected by a government institution unless it relates directly to an operating program or activity of the institution. Personal information to be collected directly 5. (1) A government institution shall, wherever possible, collect personal information that is intended to be used for an administrative purpose directly from the individual to whom it relates except where the individual authorizes otherwise or where personal information may be disclosed to the institution under subsection 8(2). Individual to be informed of purpose (2) A government institution shall inform any individual from whom the institution collects personal information about the individual of the purpose for which the information is being collected.

Medical record 28. The head of a government institution may refuse to disclose any personal information requested under subsection 12(1) that relates to the physical or mental health of the individual who requested it where the examination of the information by the individual would be contrary to the best interests of the individual.

23. Targeted Individuals harassment violates human rights legislations in Canada.  Most notable violations are gas lighting/mobbing that are severely implemented at place of employment that involves sexual harassments and racially motivated discriminations that are discussed in detail in the Canadian Human Rights Act.  Finally, the most important issue affecting targeted individuals is the violations of their “freedom of thoughts” as they are being harassed 24/7 indirectly, inducing them with voices, noises, and other conversations normally from mincrowave hearing or voice to skull technologies.

Canadian Human Rights Act
Purpose 2. The purpose of this Act is to extend the laws in Canada to give effect, within the purview of matters coming within the legislative authority of Parliament, to the principle that all individuals should have an opportunity equal with other individuals to make for themselves the lives that they are able and wish to have and to have their needs accommodated, consistent with their duties and obligations as members of society, without being hindered in or prevented from doing so by discriminatory practices based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability or conviction for an offence for which a pardon has been granted.

Employment 7. It is a discriminatory practice, directly or indirectly, (a) to refuse to employ or continue to employ any individual, or (b) in the course of employment, to differentiate adversely in relation to an employee, on a prohibited ground of discrimination. 8. It is a discriminatory practice (a) to use or circulate any form of application for employment, or (b) in connection with employment or prospective employment, to publish any advertisement or to make any written or oral inquiry that expresses or implies any limitation, specification or preference based on a prohibited ground of discrimination. Employee organizations 9. (1) It is a discriminatory practice for an employee organization on a prohibited ground of discrimination (a) to exclude an individual from full membership in the organization; (b) to expel or suspend a member of the organization; or (c) to limit, segregate, classify or otherwise act in relation to an individual in a way that would deprive the individual of employment opportunities, or limit employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect the status of the individual, where the individual is a member of the organization or where any of the obligations of the organization pursuant to a collective agreement relate to the individual.

Harassment 14. (1) It is a discriminatory practice, (a) in the provision of goods, services, facilities or accommodation customarily available to the general public, (b) in the provision of commercial premises or residential accommodation, or (c) in matters related to employment, to harass an individual on a prohibited ground of discrimination. Sexual harassment (2) Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), sexual harassment shall, for the purposes of that subsection, be deemed to be harassment on a prohibited ground of discrimination.

Canadian Bill of Rights
The Parliament of Canada, affirming that the Canadian Nation is founded upon principles that acknowledge the supremacy of God, the dignity and worth of the human person and the position of the family in a society of free men and free institutions; Affirming also that men and institutions remain free only when freedom is founded upon respect for moral and spiritual values and the rule of law; And being desirous of enshrining these principles and the human rights and fundamental freedoms derived from them, in a Bill of Rights which shall reflect the respect of Parliament for its constitutional authority and which shall ensure the protection of these rights and freedoms in Canada.

Recognition and declaration of rights and freedoms 1. It is hereby recognized and declared that in Canada there have existed and shall continue to exist without discrimination by reason of race, national origin, colour, religion or sex, the following human rights and fundamental freedoms, namely, (a) the right of the individual to life, liberty, security of the person and enjoyment of property, and the right not to be deprived thereof except by due process of law; (b) the right of the individual to equality before the law and the protection of the law; (c) freedom of religion; (d) freedom of speech; (e) freedom of assembly and association; and (f) freedom of the press.

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Part of Canadian Constitution protects its citizens from human rights violations.  The Acts sets out the values that Canadians live by and describes the kinds of personal human rights and freedoms citizens can expect in this country, this include:

•The right to life, liberty and personal security
•Freedom of conscience and religion
Freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media
•Freedom to hold peaceful meetings
•Freedom to join groups
•Protection from unreasonable search or seizure and unjustified detainment and imprisonment
•The right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty
•The right to retain and instruct counsel (a lawyer) without delay
•The right to a fair trial, through due process of law
•The right to equal protection and benefit under the law, without discrimination

Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
Functions of Review Committee 38. (b) to arrange for reviews to be conducted, or to conduct reviews, pursuant to section 40; and (c) to conduct investigations in relation to (i) complaints made to the Committee under sections 41 and 42, (ii) reports made to the Committee pursuant to section 19 of the Citizenship Act, and (iii) matters referred to the Committee pursuant to section 45 of the Canadian Human Rights Act.

Source: Justice Laws Web Site
Criminal Code (R.S., 1985, c. C-46)
Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act (2000, c. 24)
Canadian Bill of Rights (1960, c. 44)
Canadian Human Rights Act (R.S., 1985, c. H-6)
Privacy Act (R.S., 1985, c. P-21)

RELATED READING:
* Julianne McKinney on Microwave Harassment and Mind Control Experimentation — Greg Syzmanski interview (Video)
* Electronic Surveillance Project
* McKinney’s Letter to President Clinton & His Reply
* War at Home by Brian Glick
* MOBBING IS…
* David Lawson’s Investigation Into Organized Stalking
* Toby’s Act

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