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Estabrooks, Cameron, Verdier, Delgado

December 14, 2011 Comments off

condition of multiple personality – “…When the abuse is of an extreme nature, the natural human reaction is to build a wall around such experiences, so to speak, by creating a separate and distinct personality to deal with future episodes of abuse. Once the core personality is split, it is then possible to control one or more of the alters that have been created, without the conscious knowledge of the main personality. This, according to Estabrooks, creates the ‘Super Spy,’ willing to follow orders unquestioningly without even being aware that he is doing so. Estabrooks only alludes to the severe trauma that is required to create a true multiple, often referring to the trauma euphemistically as a form of hypnotism. At one point, he notes that “[multiple personalities] are caused by a form of hypnotism in the first place! We will see that emotional shock produces exactly the same results as hypnotism.” Later, he comes closer to the grim reality when he states: “multiple personality could be both caused and cured by hypnotism. Remember that war is a grim business. Suppose we deliberately set up that condition of multiple personality to further the ends of military intelligence…” (G. H. Estabrooks, PH.D.)

under deep hypnosis _ “…First I had the Service Corps call the captain to Washington and tell him they needed a report of the mechanical equipment of Division X headquartered in Tokyo. Smith was ordered to leave by jet next morning, pick up the report and return at once. Consciously, that was all he knew, and it was the story he gave to his wife and friends. Then I put him under deep hypnosis, and gave him — orally — a vital message to be delivered directly on his arrival in Japan to a certain colonel — let’s say his name was Brown — of military intelligence. Outside of myself, Colonel Brown was the only person who could hypnotize Captain Smith. This is “locking.” I performed it by saying to the hypnotized Captain: “Until further orders from me, only Colonel Brown and I can hypnotize you. We will use a signal phrase ‘the moon is clear.’ Whenever you hear this phrase from Brown or myself you will pass instantly into deep hypnosis.” When Captain Smith re-awakened, he had no conscious memory or what happened in trance. All that he was aware of was that he must head for Tokyo to pick up a division report. On arrival there, Smith reported to Brown, who hypnotized him with the signal phrase. Under hypnosis, Smith delivered my message and received one to bring back. Awakened, he was given the division report and returned home by jet. There I hypnotized him once more with the signal phrase, and he spieled off Brown’s answer that had been dutifully tucked away in his unconscious mind. The system is virtually foolproof. As exemplified by this case, the information was “locked” in Smith’s unconscious for retrieval by the only two people who knew the combination. The subject had no conscious memory of what happened, so could not spill the beans. No one else could hypnotize him even iv they might know the signal phrase…” (Hypnosis Comes of Age).

George Hoben Estabrooks (1885 – 1973) was a Canadian-American psychologist. George Estabrooks was a Harvard University graduate, a Rhodes Scholar, chairman of the Department of Psychology at Colgate University and an authority on hypnosis during World War II. He is known for hypnoprogramming U.S. government agents during World War II. “Only a people who refuse to permit themselves to sink into intellectual lethargy and conformity, only a people who question and think . . . can be sure that hypnosis–disguised or direct–will not undermine their freedom and rob them of their very lives.” (Wikepedia)

forced listening to taped messages for up to 20 hours per day, for 10 or 15 days at a stretch – “…Cameron’s technique was to expose a patient to tape-recorded messages or sounds that were played back or repeated for long periods. The goal was a condition Cameron dubbed “penetration”: The patient experienced an escalating state of distress that often caused him or her to reveal long-buried past experiences or disturbing events. At that point, the doctor would offer “healing” suggestions. Frequently, his patients didn’t want to listen and would attack their analyst or try to leave the room. In the 1956 American Journal of Psychiatry, Cameron explained that he broke down their resistance by continually repeating his message using “pillow and ceiling microphones” and different voices; by imposing periods of prolonged sleep; and by giving patients drugs like Sodium Amytal, Desoxyn, and LSD-25, which “disorganized” thought patterns. To further disorganize his patients, Cameron isolated them in a sensory deprivation chamber. In a dark room, a patient would sit in silence with his eyes covered with goggles, prevented “from touching his body—thus interfering with his self image.” Finally “attempts were made to cut down on his expressive output”—he was restrained or bandaged so he could not scream. Cameron combined these tactics with extended periods of forced listening to taped messages for up to 20 hours per day, for 10 or 15 days at a stretch. In 1958 and 1959, Cameron went further. With new CIA money behind him, he tried to completely “depattern” 53 patients by combining psychic driving with electroshock therapy and a long-term, drug-induced coma. At the most intensive stage of the treatment, many subjects were no longer able to perform even basic functions. They needed training to eat, use the toilet, or speak. Once the doctor allowed the drugs to wear off and ceased shock treatments, patients slowly relearned how to take care of themselves—and their pretreatment symptoms were said to have disappeared. So had much of their personalities. Patients emerged from Cameron’s ward walking differently, talking differently, acting differently. Wives were more docile, daughters less inclined to histrionics, sons better-behaved. Most had no memory of their treatment or of their previous lives. Sometimes, they forgot they had children. At first, they were grateful to their doctor for his help. Several Cameron patients, however, later said they had severe recurrences of their pretreatment problems and traumatic memories of the treatment itself and together sued the doctor as well as the U.S. and Canadian governments. Their case was quietly settled out of court…” (The Birth of Soft Torture)

new and unnamed religion – “…Such hubris may be claimed for Cameron, though his 1962 lecture on ‘remembering’, given at the same time in which his “depatterning” procedures were in the process of being discontinued by McGill University (see Cleghorn’s account above), provides an example that Cameron was aware that honesty was a basic human value, akin to the facts before a court of law or data before a scientific researcher, and that his ECT methods yielded unpredictable and inexact results. Cameron wrote: “In the electro-shock procedure, we have a means of producing graduated amnesia, and it is of interest to note that there is a proportional relationship between the number of electroshocks given within a period of time and the extent of the amnesias. It is quite possible, for instance, to produce a long-lasting, probably permanent, amnesia by setting the number of electroshock treatments to be given within a predetermined period (Cameron 1963, p. 328).” This admission of “probably permanent” by Cameron regarding his ECT methods should be weighed with the second half of his “depatterning,” that is to “re-educate” the patient. Both halves of the treatment regime failed and Cameron was aware of this. Science and human nature collided in the work of Dr. D. Ewen Cameron. While it remains a pedantic game for some to attempt an argument against the existence of an invariant and unique combination of instincts and learned behaviors which constitute a human “nature,” such speculations will never divorce the human brain and its “mind” from being the seat where human “nature” resides. As it’s in a bomb’s “nature” to explode and in a broken clock’s “nature” to be correct twice a day, so too with Cameron as a specialist in experimental psychology in an era with radical and new procedures and drugs with little or no governmental or peer oversight, that it was in his “nature” to err. The early accomplishments of psychology as it weaned itself from philosophy meant little to Cameron, in fact he rejected nearly all of it and likely regarded those first gains as related somehow to a new and unnamed religion. His long-time colleague at McGill University, Dr. Robert A. Cleghorn, was somewhat aware of this when he wrote: “Cameron was clearly concerned with the well-being of men, regardless of national barriers, race or religion. He opposed bigotry, and entered public debate with ecclesiastical pundits whose views he attacked by spoken and written word, perhaps a bit recklessly. He engaged a local Anglican bishop in debate over basic religious tenets, he being an agnostic, if not an atheist. This can be seen as the rebellious boy challenging a clerical father (Cleghorn 1990, p. 70).” Cleghorn was eventually instrumental in bringing an end to Cameron’s “depatterning” treatments and it remains a stark fact of history that a great many people and patients would have wished that he’d done so sooner…” (The Tragedy of Dr. D. Ewen Cameron)

mind control and brainwashing – “…The experiments were exported to Canada when the CIA recruited Scottish psychiatrist Donald Ewen Cameron, creator of the “psychic driving” concept, which the CIA found particularly interesting. Cameron had been hoping to correct schizophrenia by erasing existing memories and reprogramming the psyche. He commuted from Albany, New York to Montreal every week to work at the Allan Memorial Institute of McGill University and was paid $69,000 from 1957 to 1964 to carry out MKULTRA experiments there. In addition to LSD, Cameron also experimented with various paralytic drugs as well as electroconvulsive therapy at thirty to forty times the normal power. His “driving” experiments consisted of putting subjects into drug-induced coma for weeks at a time (up to three months in one case) while playing tape loops of noise or simple repetitive statements. His experiments were typically carried out on patients who had entered the institute for minor problems such as anxiety disorders and postpartum depression, many of whom suffered permanently from his actions. His treatments resulted in victims’ incontinence, amnesia, forgetting how to talk, forgetting their parents, and thinking their interrogators were their parents. His work was inspired and paralleled by the British psychiatrist William Sargant at St Thomas’ Hospital, London, and Belmont Hospital, Surrey, who was also involved in the Intelligence Services and who experimented extensively on his patients without their consent, causing similar long-term damage. It was during this era that Cameron became known worldwide as the first chairman of the World Psychiatric Association as well as president of the American and Canadian psychiatric associations. Cameron had also been a member of the Nuremberg medical tribunal in 1946–47. Naomi Klein states in her book The Shock Doctrine that Cameron’s research and his contribution to the MKULTRA project was actually not about mind control and brainwashing, but about designing “a scientifically based system for extracting information from ‘resistant sources.’ In other words, torture.” Stripped of its bizarre excesses, Dr. Cameron’s experiments, building upon Donald O. Hebb’s earlier breakthrough, laid the scientific foundation for the CIA’s two-stage psychological torture method…” (Wikepedia).

Dr. David Ewen Cameron (24 December 1901 – 8 September 1967), commonly referred to as “D. Ewen Cameron” or “Ewen Cameron,” was a twentieth-century Scottish-born psychiatrist who was involved in the United States Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA’s) research on mind control and served as President of the Canadian, American and World Psychiatric Associations, the American Psychopathological Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry during the 1950s…Donald Ewen Cameron is best known for his MK-ULTRA-related mind-control and behavior modification research for the CIA Cameron was President of the American Psychiatric Association in 1952-1953. Cameron lived and worked in Albany, New York, and was involved in experiments in Canada for Project MKULTRA, a United States based CIA-directed mind control program which eventually led to the publication of the KUBARK Counterintelligence Interrogation manual. Naomi Klein states in her book “The Shock Doctrine” that Dr Cameron’s research and his contribution to the MKUltra project was actually not about mind control and brainwashing, but about “to design a scientifically based system for extracting information from ‘resistant sources.’ In other words, torture.”,[9] and citing a book from Alfred W. McCoy it further says that “Stripped of its bizarre excesses, Dr. Cameron’s experiments, building upon Dr. Donald O. Hebb’s earlier breakthrough, laid the scientific foundation for the CIA’s two-stage psychological torture method.” It was during this era that Cameron became known worldwide as the first chairman of the World Psychiatric Association as well as president of the American and Canadian psychiatric associations. Cameron had also been a member of the Nuremberg medical tribunal in 1946–47 (Wikepedia).

blatantly disinformational – “…An interesting book on the topic of mind control – or as it was then termed, brainwashing – gives us some clues as to what the two boys might have endured if they had been subjected to mind control. The book – Brainwashing and the Cults: An Expose on Capturing the Human Mind – is a rather obscure title published in 1977 by Paul A. Verdier, Ph.D., a psychiatrist/hypnotist and the director of the rather Orwellian sounding ‘Institute of Behavioral Conditioning.’ Verdier was, it can be safely deduced, what many mind control researchers refer to as an agency ‘spychiatrist.’ This is readily apparent in the rabid anti-communism that permeates the book, as well as the calls for greatly expanded use of mind control techniques in the future, albeit for ‘benevolent’ purposes. These are themes that are echoed in other agency contributions to this field of literature. This particular spychiatrist veers dangerously close to revealing some truths about mind control operations however, all the while blaming everything on those damn Communists. He does though acknowledge that: “It must be accepted that brainwashing, once exclusively Russian and Chinese, is now being used here by devious persons with personal gain in mind.” It should first be noted that the notion that brainwashing was ever exclusively a tool of ‘Communist’ countries is blatantly disinformational. No less an authority on the subject than Richard Helms – who for many years was the primary overseer of the CIA’s MK-ULTRA program – testified in 1964 that: “Soviet research has consistently lagged five years behind Western research.” It is no doubt true though that mind control techniques are being used by “devious persons,” or as Verdier later states: “brainwashing … is even more gruesomely practiced by an American criminal element.” He even identifies some of the components of this ‘criminal element,’ including the Symbionese Liberation Army, the Manson Family, and “quasi-religious” organizations – especially Reverend Moon’s Unification Church. Verdier also acknowledges that the alleged assassins of the Kennedy brothers – Sirhan Sirhan and Lee Harvey Oswald – both showed signs of being under the influence of mind control. If so, he assures us, it was the work of those bastard Russians. Verdier points accusingly at Oswald’s well publicized ‘defection’ to the Soviet Union and repeats the lie that: “Russia’s work in this subject is considerably advanced over ours.” What the doctor doesn’t mention is that all of the groups and individuals that he singles out as examples of the ‘criminal element’ have documented ties to U.S. intelligence services. The so-called Symbionese Liberation Army, for example, was the result of a CIA mind control project conducted at Vacaville Medical Facility under cover of the Black Cultural Association. The project was overseen by CIA asset Colton Westbrook, who from 1966 to 1969 was in Vietnam building interrogation/torture centers where Phoenix Program operatives could hammer wooden dowels into the brains of suspected Communists…” (Ruminations on Littleton, Mind Control, and JFK).

conscious self-control – “…Years later, another CIA-connected psychiatrist/hypnotist named Paul Verdier wrote an obscure little book, entitled Brainwashing and the Cults: An Expose on Capturing the Human Mind, that echoed much of what Estabrooks had written. Verdier begins by acknowledging that: “It must be accepted that brainwashing …is now being used here by devious persons with personal gain in mind,” though he misrepresents who those “devious persons” are. He then explains that the goal of mind control is to access those areas of the brain that are outside of the conscious control of the individual by circumventing the normal inhibiting response of the cerebral cortex: “an individual’s voluntary conscious self-control must be bypassed or short-circuited.” In order to disable the brain’s “cortical block,” Verdier recommends alcohol, euphoric drugs, isolation, solitary confinement, and – “the most dramatic and unique item in the brainwashing arsenal” – hypnosis…” (Mind Control 101 An Introduction).

Paul Andre Verdier was a licensed psychologist in California. He was the first Vice President and one of the founders of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (currently over 30,000 members). Verdier was a graduate of McGill University and held degrees in mechanical engineering and psychology. He was born in Europe and immigrated to Canada. He served in the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II and obtained the rank of Lieutenant Commander. Dr. Verdier was associated with the National Research Council of Canada, the Defence Research and Development Canada, as a senior scientist with Litton Industries, and as a consultant to North American Aviation. During the late 70s, he was extremely notable and popular and was on a number of talk shows in San Diego and Los Angeles commenting on the Patty Hearst kidnapping as well as a number of cult related news stories. This was due, in large part, to the timely release of his book Brainwashing and the Cults : An Expose on Capturing the Human Mind. He died in Los Angeles, July 3, 1996, from complications brought on by pneumonia and sclerosis in the upper body (Wikepedia).

brain-implant research – “…In 1970 Delgado’s fi eld was engulfed in a scandal triggered by Frank Ervin and Vernon Mark, two researchers at Harvard Medical School with whom Delgado briefl y collaborated. (One of Ervin’s students was Michael Crichton, who wrote The Terminal Man. The best-seller, about a bionic experiment gone awry, was inspired by the research of Ervin, Mark and Delgado.) In their book, Violence and the Brain, Ervin and Mark suggested that brain stimulation or psychosurgery might quell the violent tendencies of blacks rioting in inner cities. In 1972 Heath, the Tulane psychiatrist, raised more questions about brain-implant research when he reported that he had tried to change the sexual orientation of a male homosexual by stimulating his septal region while he had intercourse with a female prostitute. The fi ercest opponent of brain implants was psychiatrist Peter Breggin (who in recent decades has focused on the dangers of psychiatric drugs). In testimony submitted into the Congressional Record in 1972, Breggin lumped Delgado, Ervin, Mark and Heath together with advocates of lobotomies and accused them of trying to create “a society in which everyone who deviates from the norm” will be “surgically mutilated.” Quoting liberally from Physical Control, Breggin singled out Delgado as “the great apologist for technologic totalitarianism.” In his 1973 book Brain Control, Elliot Valenstein, a neurophysiologist at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, presented a detailed scientific critique of brain-implant research by Delgado and others, contending that the results of stimulation were much less precise and therapeutically benefi cial than proponents often suggested…” (The work of Jose Delgado, a pioneering star)

makes use of telemetry – “…Of all the scientists who are working in this area, however, Dr. Delgado appears to be the only one using radio to stimulate animals’ brains, with special attention to effects on social behavior. He also makes use of telemetry in studying physiological activity in brains and other organs. “I do not know why more work of this sort isn’t done,” he remarked recently, “because it is so economical and easy.” Essentially, Dr. Delgado’s system for studying social behavior consists of constant time-lapse photography of animal colonies, the analysis of those films and recording of of all the animals, details in the behavior patterns. This permits not just qualitative assessment of the animals’ social interactions but also the quantification of each one’s behavioral profile, Dr. Delgado said. This is particularly important when analyzing the modifications in social behavior of the group produced by radio stimulation of a particular response in one or more of the animals. For example, stimulation of several specific regions of the brain can induce aggressiveness in a monkey. Having quantatative data on that animal’s behavior, as well as on that of others in the colony can reveal more precisely the magnitude, of various, sometimes subtle, effects of electrical stimulation on individual and collective social behavior. Of all the scientists who are working in this area, however, Dr. Delgado appears to be the only one using radio to stimulate animals’ brains, with special attention to effects on social behavior. He also makes use of telemetry in studying physiological activity in brains and other organs. “I do not know why more work of this sort isn’t done,” he remarked recently, “because it is so economical and easy.” Essentially, Dr. Delgado’s system for studying social behavior consists of constant time-lapse photography of animal colonies, the analysis of those films and recording of of all the animals, details in the behavior patterns. This permits not just qualitative assessment of the animals’ social interactions but also the quantification of each one’s behavioral profile, Dr. Delgado said. This is particularly important when analyzing the modifications in social behavior of the group produced by radio stimulation of a particular response in one or more of the animals. For example, stimulation of several specific regions of the brain can induce aggressiveness in a monkey. Having quantatative data on that animal’s behavior, as well as on that of others in the colony can reveal more precisely the magnitude, of various, sometimes subtle, effects of electrical stimulation on individual and collective social behavior…” (Dr. Jose Delgado Mind Control Experiments Reported in New York Times)

Dr. José Manuel Rodriguez Delgado (born August 8, 1915) is a Spanish professor of physiology at Yale University, famed for his research into mind control through electrical stimulation of regions in the brain. Delgado’s research interests centered on the use of electrical signals to evoke responses in the brain. His earliest work was with cats, but later did experiments with monkeys and humans, including mental patients. Much of Delgado’s work was with an invention he called a stimoceiver, a radio which joined a stimulator of brain waves with a receiver which monitored E.E.G. waves and sent them back on separate radio channels. This allowed the subject of the experiment full freedom of movement while allowing the experimenter to control the experiment. The stimoceiver could be used to stimulate emotions and control behavior. According to Delgado, “Radio Stimulation of different points in the amygdala and hippocampus in the four patients produced a variety of effects, including pleasant sensations, elation, deep, thoughtful concentration, odd feelings, super relaxation, colored visions, and other responses.” Delgado stated that “brain transmitters can remain in a person’s head for life. The energy to activate the brain transmitter is transmitted by way of radio frequencies.” (Source: Cannon; Delgado, J.M.R., “Intracerebral Radio Stimulation and recording in Completely Free Patients,” in Schwitzgebel and Schwitzgebel (eds.)) The most famous example of the stimoceiver in action occurred at a Cordoba bull breeding ranch. Delgado stepped into the ring with a bull which had had a stimoceiver implanted. The bull charged Delgado, who pressed a remote control button which caused the bull to stop its charge. Delgado claimed that the stimulus caused the bull to lose its aggressive instinct. Although the bull incident was widely mentioned in the popular media, Delgado believed that his experiment with a female chimpanzee named Paddy was more significant. Paddy was fitted with a stimoceiver linked to a computer that detected the brain signal called a spindle. When the spindle was recognized, the stimoceiver sent a signal to the central gray area of Paddy’s brain, producing an ‘aversive reaction’. Within hours her brain was producing fewer spindles (Wikepedia).

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